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"I Decided to Leave" -  a flim by Daniel Britt

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John Hodgman’s Advice to Writers

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1. Make sure you enjoy writing. Writers always like to say how hard the writing process is and how much suffering it causes. They’re lying. People don’t like to admit they make a living from something they genuinely enjoy.

The first of Etgar Keret’s ten rules for writers echoes Ray Bradbury’s insistence on writing with joy.

For more timeless advice on writing, see writing rules by:

Neil Gaiman

Zadie Smith

Kurt Vonnegut

John Steinbeck

David Ogilvy

Henry Miller

Jack Kerouack

Susan Sontag

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Life, by way of Robert Frost, hand-lettered by Lisa Congdon

Life, by way of Robert Frost, hand-lettered by Lisa Congdon

(via explore-blog)

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Make Good Art

"Sometimes life is hard. Things go wrong - and in life, and in love, and in business, and in friendship, and in health, and in all the other ways in which life can go wrong. And when things get tough, this is what you should do: make good art. I’m serious. Husband runs off with a politician…make good art. Leg crushed and then eaten by a mutated boa constrictor…make good art. IRS on your trail…make good art. Cat exploded…make good art. Someone on the internet thinks what you’re doing is stupid, or evil, or it’s all been done before…make good art. Probably things will work out somehow and eventually time will take the sting away, and that doesn’t even matter.  Do what only you can do best…make good art" - Neil Gaiman

More: Writing Inspiration

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Formula for Writing

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced that there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes but by no means always find the way to do it" - letter from John Steinbeck

More: Writing Inspiration

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Creativity is the residue of wasted time.
Jonah Lehrer, author of  the excellent Imagine: How Creativity Works, quotes Albert Einstein at the 99% Conference. (via explore-blog)
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Personal Tragedy

"Forget your personal tragedy. We are all bitched from the start and you especially have to hurt like hell before you can write seriously. But when you get the damned hurt use it—don’t cheat with it. Be as faithful to it as a scientist—but don’t think anything is of any importance because it happens to you or anyone belonging to you" - letter from Ernest Hemingway to F. Scott Fitzgerald

More: Writing Inspiration

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Excerpts & Fragments #4

There is something innately creative about early morning skies. The day’s first light pulling the city out of the dark, spreading and expanding through the ether, shading purplish-orange up to solid pillow layered clouds. Reflective mists swirl a gray dirty dawn, filtering and following eerily shaped silhouettes of a complicated skyline. Outstretching steel and glass scratch the tops of the heavens. Monstrous concrete parking garages stack across the horizon. A deep tired sigh as the city wakes up. A quiet sitting waiting for an afternoon empty of art.

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Life Plans

"Life is what happens while you’re busy making other plans" - John Lennon

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Sadder and Perceptive

They rushed down the streets together digging everything in the early way they had which has later become so much sadder and perceptive.. but then they danced down the street like dingledodies and I shambled after as usual as I’ve been doing all my life after people who interest me - Jack Kerouac from On the Road (The Original Scroll)

This passage from “On the Road” is the right before one of the most often quoted passages of the book, the one that goes something like…the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to breath, mad to eat, the ones who never yawn or say commonplace things, etc.

That famous passage leaped off the page when I first read the book. I liked it because it was raw and inspiring, and it seemed cool to read to a girl I was trying to impress. But as I was flipping through the book this weekend, I stopped at the sentence right before the famous sentence, which says something to the effect that looking back, everything Kerouac is about to explain in the book has no real meaning. I read the passage to mean that there is no pot of gold at the end of this mad rainbow. Instead, life is about the self-destructing/self-creating journey that is worth embarking on, even when later you look back on everything you have done and it seems much sadder and perceptive. For some reason, that gave me comfort today.

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